What We Can Learn from Organisms that Live in Ice

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Nov 12, 2018 10:00 pm
  • 12:44 mins

Guest: Daniel Shain, PhD, Professor of Zoology, Rutgers University- Camden There are some strange creatures that thrive in extremely cold places on this planet – tiny worms that live inside glacier ice, for example. Zoologist Daniel Shain has dedicated his career to understanding how these organisms do it. Unlocking the secret of their tolerance to extreme cold could help scientists engineer new types of crops for chilly climates or extend the life of an organ for transplant, say. Shain is a professor at Rutgers University-Camden and he joins us on the line.

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Guest: Rory Truex, Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Department of Politics, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University Eight years ago, Google took its search engine offline in China because the company didn’t want to comply with China’s censorship rules. Since then, Google has been secretly developing a version of its search engine that would satisfy the Chinese government’s demands. More than a thousand Google employees signed a letter protesting the project on ethical grounds. But Google’s CEO says the search engine would provide better information for Chinese citizens. In moving back into the Chinese market, is Google going back on its motto, "Don't Be Evil?"