Drinking Water, Depression in Adolescents, Digital Security

Drinking Water, Depression in Adolescents, Digital Security

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Mar 1, 2016 10:00 pm
  • 1:41:20 mins
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Drinking Water Safety (1:03) Guest: David Sedlak, PhD, Co-director of Berkeley Water Center and Author of “Water 4.0: The Past, Present and Future of the World’s Most Vital Resource”  “Flint” has become synonymous with lead-contaminated water, but just a few mishaps or bad decisions could land any number of cities across the country in a version of the same trouble.  Screening for Depression (19:05) Guest: Alex Krist, MD, Associate Professor of Family Medicine and Population Health in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine  When teens go in for a check-up, the doctor looks at their tonsils, their eyes and checks the spine for scoliosis. Now the US Preventive Services Task Force says teens should be regularly screened for depression too. One in twelve adolescents reported having a major depressive episode in the last year.  Apple Seed (40:32) Guest: Sam Payne, Host of the Apple Seed  Sam Payne joins us in studio to captivate us with a new story.  Digital Security (50:36) Guest: Bonnie Anderson, PhD, Marriott School Information Systems Professor and Neurosecurity Researcher at Brigham Young University  Improving our security online is a $67 billion-year business. It’s huge. And yet, what’s your instinct when you’re surfing the web and a little window pops up warning you could be at risk? Most of us hit ignore and move on. We, the human users, are the weak link in internet security. But it’s not all our fault. Studies conducted in the neurosecurity lab here at BYU show our biology deserves some of the blame, too.  Domestic Violence and Brain Trauma (1:07:31) Guest: Rachel Louise Snyder, Investigative Journalist and Professor of Literary Journalism at American University  In a domestic violence case, police typically collect statements from the victim and witnesses, and they’ll photograph physical signs of abuse, such as bruises or bleeding. Often the victim will be taken to a hospital to be checked out by a doctor. But these standard procedures are likely to miss signs of brain injury caused by strangulation, which is extremely common in domestic abuse cases.  Voter ID Laws in Primary States (1:23:15) Guest: Adam Gitlin, Counsel for the Democracy Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law  It’s Super Tuesday and people voting in several states holding primary elections today are encountering new rules that require they show a photo ID or prove they’re an American citizen.  More than 30 states now require some form of identification to vote, many of which have become stricter since the last presidential election. Today in Texas, where the most primary delegates are up for grabs, voters for the first time are being asked to prove their identity with either a driver license, a military ID card, a US passport, a certificate of US citizenship or a license to carry a concealed handgun. A federal court found some 600-thousand registered Texas voters don’t have the required ID to cast a ballot.

Episode Segments

Voter ID Laws in Primary States

18m

Guest: Adam Gitlin, Counsel for the Democracy Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law  It’s Super Tuesday and people voting in several states holding primary elections today are encountering new rules that require they show a photo ID or prove they’re an American citizen.  More than 30 states now require some form of identification to vote, many of which have become stricter since the last presidential election. Today in Texas, where the most primary delegates are up for grabs, voters for the first time are being asked to prove their identity with either a driver license, a military ID card, a US passport, a certificate of US citizenship or a license to carry a concealed handgun. A federal court found some 600-thousand registered Texas voters don’t have the required ID to cast a ballot.

Guest: Adam Gitlin, Counsel for the Democracy Program of the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s School of Law  It’s Super Tuesday and people voting in several states holding primary elections today are encountering new rules that require they show a photo ID or prove they’re an American citizen.  More than 30 states now require some form of identification to vote, many of which have become stricter since the last presidential election. Today in Texas, where the most primary delegates are up for grabs, voters for the first time are being asked to prove their identity with either a driver license, a military ID card, a US passport, a certificate of US citizenship or a license to carry a concealed handgun. A federal court found some 600-thousand registered Texas voters don’t have the required ID to cast a ballot.

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