Family & Lifestyle

Pardoning the Turkey, Pop Culture, Ethical Chocolate, Examining History, Movies

The Lisa Show
  • Nov 16, 2018 4:00 pm
  • 1:38:00

Important conversations and encouraging words to help you make every day a great one. Pardoning the Turkey Where did the American national tradition of pardoning the turkey come from? Who started it? And most of all, why do we keep it going when literally nobody seems to like it? Here to discuss the wacky tradition of turkey pardoning is film critic and all-around funny guy Eric D Snider. Pop Culture Regular guest Kacy Faulconer and Lisa talk about all things pop culture. Ethical Chocolate Here in the United States, we love chocolate. It makes consumers happy, can give a pick-me-up to someone having a bad day, and kids love it. But not everyone loves chocolate—particularly not the child laborers in West Africa who are forced to make it. Though it’s hard to get accurate figures on trafficking, the International Labor Organization concluded in 2002 that there were about 12,000 child laborers in the Ivory Coast who had been trafficked. Though that number has most likely fallen since then, trafficking and slave labor in the chocolate industry still happen. Ayn Riggs, the Director of Slave Free Chocolate, joins us today to talk about the chocolate industry, her organization, and how we as consumers can make more ethical choices when it comes to our chocolate. To learn more about what you can do to support ethical chocolate, visit www.slavefreechocolate.org. Examining History In recent years, the traditional story of Thanksgiving has been troubled. How accurate is the story we tell, anyway? Why has it been acceptable for so long for kids to dress up in heavily stereotyped versions of indigenous clothing? Most important, perhaps, where are the Native American voices in the tale? Why don’t our history books focus more on the Native perspective? Today Jenny Pulsipher, an associate professor of history at BYU who specializes in early American and American Indian history, joins us to answer these questions, and to help us figure out the best way to responsibly learn and teach American history. Her most recent book is Swindler Sachem: The American Indian Who Sold His Birthright, Dropped Out of Harvard, and Conned the King of England. Movies Producer Rod Gustafson joins Lisa to talk about the movies that are out right now and which ones to see. Movies discussed include The Crimes of Grindewald and Instant Family.