• Sep 11, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 26:46 mins

Guest: Jeremy Carl, PhD, Research Fellow and Director of Shultz-Stephenson Task Force on Energy Policy, Hoover Institution, Stanford University Just a decade ago, there was talk of a “nuclear renaissance” in the US. Plans were in the works for several new nuclear plants – the first to be built in the US in 40 years. But a couple of weeks back, construction was abandoned on two of those new nuclear reactors – they’re not even halfway built but had already cost 9-billion dollars. And the energy companies building them decided just to cut their losses and walk away. The future of nuclear power in America looks bleak at the moment. But Jeremy Carl says it’s not too late to save it.

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Saving Lives with Medicine Pouch

11 MINS

Guest: Robert Malkin, PhD, Professor of the Practices of Biomedical Engineering and Global Health, Duke University More than one million children in the world have HIV. Many of them got it from their mothers at birth. Transmission of the virus from mother to child can be prevented if the baby receives HIV drugs soon after being born. But many babies in the developing world are born at home and either don’t get the medicine or receive it too late.  That’s why Duke University Professor Robert Malkin and his engineering students invented the Pratt Pouch—it’s like a ketchup packet of antiretroviral drugs that can last up to a year and doesn’t need any refrigeration. The mother just tears it open and squeezes the medicine into her baby’s mouth after birth.

Guest: Robert Malkin, PhD, Professor of the Practices of Biomedical Engineering and Global Health, Duke University More than one million children in the world have HIV. Many of them got it from their mothers at birth. Transmission of the virus from mother to child can be prevented if the baby receives HIV drugs soon after being born. But many babies in the developing world are born at home and either don’t get the medicine or receive it too late.  That’s why Duke University Professor Robert Malkin and his engineering students invented the Pratt Pouch—it’s like a ketchup packet of antiretroviral drugs that can last up to a year and doesn’t need any refrigeration. The mother just tears it open and squeezes the medicine into her baby’s mouth after birth.