Ruby Bridges

Ruby Bridges

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Syrian Refugee Children, Croatian Ambassador, Social Networks

Episode: Syrian Refugee Children, Croatian Ambassador, Social Networks

  • Feb 4, 2016 10:00 pm
  • 24:40 mins

Guest: Ruby Bridges, a Civil Rights icon since the age of six, when she was among the first African American children to integrate an all-white school in the South Norman Rockwell’s iconic painting of a tiny African American girl flanked by four federal marshals is called “The Problem We All Live With,” and it’s a provocative invitation to consider the ugliness of racism. The girl’s dress and sneakers and the little bow in her braided hair are impossibly white. She looks calm and resolute, even though the wall she’s walking by is marred with a racial slur and the splatter of tomatoes. She’s Ruby Bridges, and November 14, 1960 was her first day of first grade as one of the first African American children to integrate an all-white school in the South. Looking at the painting, you can’t help but wonder what’s going through her mind. Make sure to see the exhibit yourself at the BYU Museum of Art. Last day is February 13th.

Other Segments

Syrian Refugee Children

Feb 4, 2016

Guest: Dr. Selcuk Sirin, PhD, Associate Professor of Applied Psychology at New York University Of the more than 4 million refugees fleeing war and poverty in Syria, about half are children – most under the age of twelve. Now, we’ve all seen how resilient kids can be in adapting to new environments and overcoming hardship. But what these young Syrians have – and continue – to experience is something different altogether. And the research of New York University psychology researcher Selcuk Sirin suggests the mental health needs of most of these children are not being met by the international community. Sirin spent time interviewing young Syrian refugees at a camp in Turkey to get a handle on both their mental health and educational needs.

Guest: Dr. Selcuk Sirin, PhD, Associate Professor of Applied Psychology at New York University Of the more than 4 million refugees fleeing war and poverty in Syria, about half are children – most under the age of twelve. Now, we’ve all seen how resilient kids can be in adapting to new environments and overcoming hardship. But what these young Syrians have – and continue – to experience is something different altogether. And the research of New York University psychology researcher Selcuk Sirin suggests the mental health needs of most of these children are not being met by the international community. Sirin spent time interviewing young Syrian refugees at a camp in Turkey to get a handle on both their mental health and educational needs.