Positive Energy

Positive Energy

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Filing Taxes, Complacent Class, Public Protests in Jeopardy

Episode: Filing Taxes, Complacent Class, Public Protests in Jeopardy

  • Apr 18, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 17:46 mins

Guest: Kim Cameron, PhD, Professor of Higher Education and Professor of Management and Organizations, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, Fellow at the Wheatley Institution, BYU Most adults would love to have more energy in their lives. Most kids only have a problem with excess energy.  When it comes to the workplace, energy seems like a means to an end. It’s all about how to manage your energy so you don’t lose steam before the end of the day. And that’s what the 3 p.m. snack is for, right? But sugar and caffeine aren’t the only ways to boost your energy. Certain types of interactions at work can also be energizing – and those can lead people to do even better work.

Other Segments

The Rise of America's Complacent Class

Apr 18, 2017

Guest: Tyler Cowen, PhD, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics, Chairman and General Director of the Mercatus Center, George Mason University When Donald Trump campaigned to “Make America Great Again,” he tapped into a feeling among many people that the American Dream is dying – if not already dead. A lot has been made of how disenfranchised white, working-class Americans feel in the current economy, but George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen says there's a wide swath of Americans, from the wealthiest and best-educated among us to those stuck in a cycle of low-wage work and dysfunctional personal lives, who have virtually given up on trying to boost their status. Cowen's new book is called "The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

Guest: Tyler Cowen, PhD, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics, Chairman and General Director of the Mercatus Center, George Mason University When Donald Trump campaigned to “Make America Great Again,” he tapped into a feeling among many people that the American Dream is dying – if not already dead. A lot has been made of how disenfranchised white, working-class Americans feel in the current economy, but George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen says there's a wide swath of Americans, from the wealthiest and best-educated among us to those stuck in a cycle of low-wage work and dysfunctional personal lives, who have virtually given up on trying to boost their status. Cowen's new book is called "The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

New Antidote for Snake Venom

Apr 18, 2017

Guest: Ken Shea, PhD, Chemistry Professor, University of California, Irvine Snake bites are relatively rare in the US, but globally they’re considered a serious threat. More than two-and-a-half million people suffer crippling injuries such as the loss of a limb each year from snake bites. More than 100,000 people die. But effective treatment and antidotes remain elusive – especially in poor, rural areas of Africa and Southeast Asia where the threat is greatest.  So there’s considerable excitement about the work being done by chemist Ken Shea at the University of California at Irvine. He’s developed an anti-venom that’s cheap to make, needs no refrigeration and appears to work on lots of different poisonous snake and insect venoms.

Guest: Ken Shea, PhD, Chemistry Professor, University of California, Irvine Snake bites are relatively rare in the US, but globally they’re considered a serious threat. More than two-and-a-half million people suffer crippling injuries such as the loss of a limb each year from snake bites. More than 100,000 people die. But effective treatment and antidotes remain elusive – especially in poor, rural areas of Africa and Southeast Asia where the threat is greatest.  So there’s considerable excitement about the work being done by chemist Ken Shea at the University of California at Irvine. He’s developed an anti-venom that’s cheap to make, needs no refrigeration and appears to work on lots of different poisonous snake and insect venoms.