The Case for More Immigration from Poor Countries

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jul 27, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 27:59

Guest: Lant Pritchett, PhD, Professor of Practice of International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard President Trump is unapologetic about his approach to immigration. He wants people to "Buy American and Hire American." Immigrants, Trump says, threaten our jobs and our safety. He's particularly critical of low-skilled immigrants from poor countries coming to the US to take advantage of higher paying jobs and better quality of life.  However, Pritchett says those are precisely the immigrants America needs more of. He says their contributions are good for our economy and much better for their home countries than the billions of dollars the US spends every year trying to improve the economy, education and health of people in developing nations.

The Case for More Immigration from Poor Countries

27:59 MINS

Guest: Lant Pritchett, PhD, Professor of Practice of International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard President Trump is unapologetic about his approach to immigration. He wants people to "Buy American and Hire American." Immigrants, Trump says, threaten our jobs and our safety. He's particularly critical of low-skilled immigrants from poor countries coming to the US to take advantage of higher paying jobs and better quality of life.  However, Pritchett says those are precisely the immigrants America needs more of. He says their contributions are good for our economy and much better for their home countries than the billions of dollars the US spends every year trying to improve the economy, education and health of people in developing nations.

Guest: Lant Pritchett, PhD, Professor of Practice of International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard President Trump is unapologetic about his approach to immigration. He wants people to "Buy American and Hire American." Immigrants, Trump says, threaten our jobs and our safety. He's particularly critical of low-skilled immigrants from poor countries coming to the US to take advantage of higher paying jobs and better quality of life.  However, Pritchett says those are precisely the immigrants America needs more of. He says their contributions are good for our economy and much better for their home countries than the billions of dollars the US spends every year trying to improve the economy, education and health of people in developing nations.

Unidentified Burials for the Mentally Ill

18:58 MINS

(Originally aired Mar. 13, 2017) Guest: Janina Chilton, Historian for the Utah State Hospital There’s a cemetery just down the road from our studio here in Provo, Utah where 474 unmarked graves contain the remains of patients who died while housed at the Utah Territorial Insane Asylum. They died paupers, and when no families came to claim the bodies, they were buried in graves that have been long since forgotten.  This scenario played out in cemeteries near mental hospitals across the country during the 1800s and early 1900s. Today communities from Minnesota to Mississippi to right here in Provo, Utah, are working to restore some dignity to these forgotten graves. For more information on the Forgotten Patient's Cemetery Project click here.

(Originally aired Mar. 13, 2017) Guest: Janina Chilton, Historian for the Utah State Hospital There’s a cemetery just down the road from our studio here in Provo, Utah where 474 unmarked graves contain the remains of patients who died while housed at the Utah Territorial Insane Asylum. They died paupers, and when no families came to claim the bodies, they were buried in graves that have been long since forgotten.  This scenario played out in cemeteries near mental hospitals across the country during the 1800s and early 1900s. Today communities from Minnesota to Mississippi to right here in Provo, Utah, are working to restore some dignity to these forgotten graves. For more information on the Forgotten Patient's Cemetery Project click here.

Back From a Year on "Mars"

21:01 MINS

(Originally aired Oct. 3, 2016) Guest: Christiane Heinicke, PhD, Physicist who Completed a Year-Long Simulation in a Mars Habitat Fifteen years from now, NASA hopes to send the first astronauts to Mars, but there’s a lot to figure out in the meantime. Anyone who goes to Mars will need to spend a lot of time in a shelter of some sort and wear a spacesuit when outside – because of intense radiation from the sun. And it’ll be a long mission – the flight to Mars takes six months and they’ll have to spend a few years there before returning to Earth. So NASA needs to know how humans will hold up under the stressful of such isolation and being in tight quarters with the same few people for so long. So that’s how six volunteers ended up in a simulated Mars habitat funded by NASA on the rocky surface of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii

(Originally aired Oct. 3, 2016) Guest: Christiane Heinicke, PhD, Physicist who Completed a Year-Long Simulation in a Mars Habitat Fifteen years from now, NASA hopes to send the first astronauts to Mars, but there’s a lot to figure out in the meantime. Anyone who goes to Mars will need to spend a lot of time in a shelter of some sort and wear a spacesuit when outside – because of intense radiation from the sun. And it’ll be a long mission – the flight to Mars takes six months and they’ll have to spend a few years there before returning to Earth. So NASA needs to know how humans will hold up under the stressful of such isolation and being in tight quarters with the same few people for so long. So that’s how six volunteers ended up in a simulated Mars habitat funded by NASA on the rocky surface of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii