Ruby Bridges, Battle of Midway, Alexander Hamilton

Ruby Bridges, Battle of Midway, Alexander Hamilton

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Nov 15, 2019 11:00 pm
  • 1:40:42 mins
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The Little Girl Who Became the Face of School Integration (0:34) Guest: Ruby Bridges, Civil Rights Activist Thursday marked the 59th anniversary of the day Ruby Bridges became a Civil Rights icon. That was her first day of first grade as one of the first African American children to integrate an all-white school in the South. Norman Rockwell turned that moment into an iconic painting –you know the one. There’s tiny Ruby Bridges in a white dress, sneakers and bow in her braid. She’s flanked by federal marshals in suits. And she looks so calm and resolute, even though the wall she’s walking by is marred with a racial slur and the red splatter of tomatoes. (Originally aired November 19, 2015).  The Unsung Hero of the Battle of Midway (16:27) Guest: David Rigby, Author of “Wade McClusky and the Battle of Midway” With Veterans Day fresh on our minds, lets revisit the story of US Navy pilot Wade McClusky. Six months after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, the US dealt a devastating blow to Japan’s naval fleetin what’s known as the Battle of Midway. Historians consider it a turning point of World War II in the Pacific. But it almost wasn’t. The bombers sent to sneak-attack Japan’s aircraft carriers got bad information: the ships weren’t where they were supposed to be, and the American planes were running low on fuel. So, Wade McClusky followed his gut and, I know this sounds dramatic, but he literally made history. Historian David Rigby is the first to publish the story in full. (Originally aired June 20, 2019).  More than a Musical, a Look Behind the Scenes of Alexander Hamilton (35:36) Guest: Joanne Freeman is a Professor of History and American Studies at Yale University Four years since it opened on Broadway, Hamilton: An American Musical is still one of the hottest tickets in town. But just how accurate is its portrayal of Alexander Hamilton? Earlier this year we got the answer from historian Joanne Freeman –she’s a professor at Yale University. She worked with Lin Manuel Miranda and others from the Hamilton musical team to create an interactive exhibit about the founding father and war veteran. It was open during the Spring and Summer in Chicago. (Originally aired July 1, 2019). Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution (51:13) Guest: Beth Gardiner, Environmental Journalist, Author, “Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution” The air in Delhi, India is famously polluted, but this week it got so bad that the government was forced to close schools. For the second time in two weeks. The concentration of noxious stuff in the air is right now 10-times higher than what’s considered safe. India isn’t the only one. Globally, hundreds of thousands of people die prematurely each year from poor air. Scientists are discovering air pollution is linked to heart attacks, heart attacks, strokes, birth defects, cancer, dementia, diabetes and Parkinson’s disease. Environmental journalist Beth Gardiner’s book “Choked” examines the consequences of air pollution around the world. (Originally aired August 8, 2019).  Where Do Pets Go During Natural Disasters? (1:25:41) Guest: Sarah E. DeYoung, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology & Criminal Justice and the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware, Investigator for the Pets and Evacuation Research Project In emergency situations like a wildfire or hurricane, people are obviously the number one priority. But what about pets? Many view their dog or cat as another family member, yet most people –and their communities –have little, if any evacuation plan for pets. (Originally aired July 31, 2019).

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