Lack of Innovation is an Empowerment Problem

Lack of Innovation is an Empowerment Problem

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 696 , Segment 2

Episode: Gay Wedding Cake Case, Lack of Innovation, Better Auto-Focus

  • Dec 5, 2017
  • 15:48 mins

Guest: David Lee, Vice President, Innovation, UPS Have you ever felt like life didn’t start until after you clocked out at 5 p.m.? For many of us, that is when our passion for doing things really comes out, when we aren’t at work. Innovation expert David Lee believes the thing American industry needs today is more jobs where people can bring their interests and passions. He talks about how unfortunate it is that we’re often our most creative, energetic selves on Saturday and, come Monday morning, we leave that person in the trunk of the car. David Lee's TED talk

Other Segments

Predicting Rainfall During Climate Change

14 MINS

Guest: Michael Bliss Singer, PhD, Researcher, Earth Research Institute, UC Santa Barbara and Lecturer, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University All across the arid West, there are dry streambeds that are pretty much always dry. You’ve probably walked over them without noticing, if you’ve spent much time in Nevada or Arizona. But, if you’ve ever been caught in the desert during a summer thunderstorm, you know how fast that dry streambed can turn into a rush of water. These “runoff events” can cause lots of damage if there are homes nearby, but they’re also a critical part of the desert ecosystem and important for rivers downstream.  Hydrologists at UC Santa Barbara’s Earth Research Institute have been trying to understand how drought and climate change are affecting this thunderstorm-runoff equation in the American West.

Guest: Michael Bliss Singer, PhD, Researcher, Earth Research Institute, UC Santa Barbara and Lecturer, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University All across the arid West, there are dry streambeds that are pretty much always dry. You’ve probably walked over them without noticing, if you’ve spent much time in Nevada or Arizona. But, if you’ve ever been caught in the desert during a summer thunderstorm, you know how fast that dry streambed can turn into a rush of water. These “runoff events” can cause lots of damage if there are homes nearby, but they’re also a critical part of the desert ecosystem and important for rivers downstream.  Hydrologists at UC Santa Barbara’s Earth Research Institute have been trying to understand how drought and climate change are affecting this thunderstorm-runoff equation in the American West.