• Feb 2, 2018
  • 22:17 mins

Guest: Dick Lehr, Professor of Journalism, Boston University, Author of “Trell” The murder of 12-year-old Tiffany Moore on a Boston street in 1988 was a turning point in the city’s fight against drugs and gang violence. Police believed the African American girl had been an innocent victim of gang gunfire. The pressure was on to solve the case and send a strong message about law and justice. A few weeks later, they arrested a man who would ultimately get a life sentence for the killing. But they got the wrong guy. Fifteen years later an investigative reporter at the Boston Globe dug into the case and uncovered a host of police and prosecutorial wrongdoing.

Other Segments

How Self-Driving Cars Could Prevent Terror Attacks (Originally aired: Nov. 7, 2017)

9 MINS

Guest: Jeremy Straub, PhD, Professor of Computer Science, North Dakota State University In the last 18 months, terrorists pledging allegiance to ISIS have made trucks their preferred weapons. More than 100 people around the world have been killed in nearly a dozen such attacks, including eight fatalities in New York City last Halloween. When someone uses a gun to kill lots of people, we immediately start debating gun control. Debating “vehicle control” after a terror attack seems preposterous, but what if the focus weren’t on controlling who can drive one? What if we focus on technology that would let the vehicle take control away from the driver who tries to steer the truck into a crowd of people?

Guest: Jeremy Straub, PhD, Professor of Computer Science, North Dakota State University In the last 18 months, terrorists pledging allegiance to ISIS have made trucks their preferred weapons. More than 100 people around the world have been killed in nearly a dozen such attacks, including eight fatalities in New York City last Halloween. When someone uses a gun to kill lots of people, we immediately start debating gun control. Debating “vehicle control” after a terror attack seems preposterous, but what if the focus weren’t on controlling who can drive one? What if we focus on technology that would let the vehicle take control away from the driver who tries to steer the truck into a crowd of people?