• Feb 1, 2017
  • 22:14 mins

Guest: Ryan Vogel, J.D., Professor and Founding Director of the Center for National Security Studies, Utah Valley University It’s been a dramatic 24 hours for the US Justice Department, stemming from President Trump’s order temporarily banning all refugees from entering the US, as well as citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The order also bans Syrian refugees from resettling in the US indefinitely.  Late Monday, Acting Attorney General Sally Yates ordered Justice Department lawyers not to defend President Trump’s immigration order because she wasn’t convinced it was legal. President Trump swiftly fired her and calling her “an Obama Administration appointee, who is weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration.” A new acting Attorney General who will defend Trump’s order was sworn in around 9 p.m. Monday. Then today, a committee of senators was supposed to vote on Trump’s nominee for Attorney General Jeff Sessions, but Democrats delayed that citing concern that Sessions wouldn’t stand up to Trump if he thought the president were doing something illegal.   Meanwhile, Trump’s order, officially titled, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” continues to draw protests and praise.

Other Segments

What Obamacare Was Really About

21 MINS

Guest: J.B. Silvers, PhD, Professor of Health Care Management at Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University This is the last day people can sign up for health insurance in 2017 through the state and federal marketplaces – or “exchanges” – created by the Affordable Care Act.  It could be the last Obamacare enrollment period ever, since President Trump and Republicans in Congress are in the process of repealing it. If you get insurance through your employer or from Medicaid or Medicare, this deadline doesn’t mean much to you, because the Obamacare marketplaces are meant for people who are self-employed or retired early or work an hourly job that doesn’t offer health benefits. They make up the “individual insurance market” and what you may not realize is that Obamacare was primarily created for them. So, they will be among those most affected if its repealed.

Guest: J.B. Silvers, PhD, Professor of Health Care Management at Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University This is the last day people can sign up for health insurance in 2017 through the state and federal marketplaces – or “exchanges” – created by the Affordable Care Act.  It could be the last Obamacare enrollment period ever, since President Trump and Republicans in Congress are in the process of repealing it. If you get insurance through your employer or from Medicaid or Medicare, this deadline doesn’t mean much to you, because the Obamacare marketplaces are meant for people who are self-employed or retired early or work an hourly job that doesn’t offer health benefits. They make up the “individual insurance market” and what you may not realize is that Obamacare was primarily created for them. So, they will be among those most affected if its repealed.