Does Share-Splitting Make a Difference Anymore?

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Jun 27, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 14:20 mins

Guest: William C. Weld, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Finance, University of North Carolina In the last month, Amazon’s stock price has come tantalizingly close to $1000 per share, which means that anybody wanting to buy into Amazon should be ready to cough up some serious dough. But twenty or thirty years ago, this never would have happened. Any company whose stock had grown to a value this big would have performed a “stock-split,” which is like trading one $500 share for two shares worth $250 each. These days stock splitting is very rare.

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Are Laptop Bans Really Effective?

20 MINS

Guest: Sheldon Jacobson, PhD, Professor of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Airplane security seems to be a moving target: when officials got wind that terrorists were cooking up explosives made of liquids and gels, along came the 3 oz carry-on limit. Then came the attempted underwear and shoe bombers, so now we have to take off our shoes and get a full-body scan to check our underwear before boarding a flight. Laptops already have to come out and be turned on for scanning. Recently, the US banned laptops in the cabin of flights coming from 10 airports in the Middle East. That prohibition may soon extend to all international flights in and out of the US. Do these widening bans on carry-on items make us that much safer? Where does it end?

Guest: Sheldon Jacobson, PhD, Professor of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Airplane security seems to be a moving target: when officials got wind that terrorists were cooking up explosives made of liquids and gels, along came the 3 oz carry-on limit. Then came the attempted underwear and shoe bombers, so now we have to take off our shoes and get a full-body scan to check our underwear before boarding a flight. Laptops already have to come out and be turned on for scanning. Recently, the US banned laptops in the cabin of flights coming from 10 airports in the Middle East. That prohibition may soon extend to all international flights in and out of the US. Do these widening bans on carry-on items make us that much safer? Where does it end?