Too Cute to Handle
  • Jan 9, 2019 11:00 pm
  • 14:39 mins

Guest: Oriana Aragón, Assistant Professor of Marketing at Clemson University Have you ever seen something so cute like a kitten or puppy that you just wanted to squeeze it? Or have you heard someone tell a baby, “You’re so cute, I could just eat you up” or “I want to smother you in kisses.” These aggressive responses to cute things are kind of weird when you think about it, but research shows they actually serve a purpose.

Other Segments

A Breakthrough on Getting Brain Scans on Children with Autism

12 MINS

Guests: Terisa Gabrielsen, Assistant Professor of School Psychology, BYU; Ryan Kellems, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, BYU; Mikle South, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, BYU  To undergo an MRI, you lie down and slide into a huge machine that makes loud noises while you hold completely still for up to 45 minutes. It’s a stressful thing for anyone –but for a child with autism, it can be totally overwhelming. Which is why not much brain scan research has been done to understand the neuroscience behind autism. But a team of researchers at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah have developed a technique to ease the MRI process for autistic children.

Guests: Terisa Gabrielsen, Assistant Professor of School Psychology, BYU; Ryan Kellems, Assistant Professor of Counseling Psychology and Special Education, BYU; Mikle South, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, BYU  To undergo an MRI, you lie down and slide into a huge machine that makes loud noises while you hold completely still for up to 45 minutes. It’s a stressful thing for anyone –but for a child with autism, it can be totally overwhelming. Which is why not much brain scan research has been done to understand the neuroscience behind autism. But a team of researchers at Brigham Young University and the University of Utah have developed a technique to ease the MRI process for autistic children.