Egypt Five Years Beyond the Uprising

Egypt Five Years Beyond the Uprising

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Egypt, Sundance, Suicide and Altitude, Waking Up White

Episode: Egypt, Sundance, Suicide and Altitude, Waking Up White

  • Jan 28, 2016 11:00 pm
  • 22:33 mins

Guest: Michele Dunne, PhD, Director of the Carnegie Middle East Program, Former Middle East Specialist at the US Department of State  Five years ago this week, tens of thousands of Egyptians took to the streets calling for more freedom, a better economy and less corruption. They wanted longtime dictator Hosni Mubarak gone. And after 18 days of protest, he resigned. The country rejoiced. The world dubbed it an Arab Spring and thought it just might be the end to a long era of dictators ruling Egypt with a strong fist.  But today, many experts say Egypt is in a spot that’s just as bad as it was before the uprising.

Other Segments

Suicide and Altitude

14m

Guest: Perry Renshaw, MD, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah  By one ranking, Utah is America’s happiest state. The beautiful surroundings certainly contribute – if you’ve never seen the mountain range running along Utah’s biggest cities, you’re missing out.  But here’s a paradox that puzzles public health officials: the suicide rate in the American West – Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming—is roughly 1.5 times higher than in the rest of the nation. Researchers sometimes call it "the Suicide Belt."  Is it the landscape? The social structure? Something in the “Western mindset” that causes more people to take their own life? University of Utah psychiatry professor Perry Renshaw has proposed an intriguing hypothesis – he says it’s the altitude.

Guest: Perry Renshaw, MD, Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah  By one ranking, Utah is America’s happiest state. The beautiful surroundings certainly contribute – if you’ve never seen the mountain range running along Utah’s biggest cities, you’re missing out.  But here’s a paradox that puzzles public health officials: the suicide rate in the American West – Utah, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, and Wyoming—is roughly 1.5 times higher than in the rest of the nation. Researchers sometimes call it "the Suicide Belt."  Is it the landscape? The social structure? Something in the “Western mindset” that causes more people to take their own life? University of Utah psychiatry professor Perry Renshaw has proposed an intriguing hypothesis – he says it’s the altitude.

hello world