Counterterrorism, All Souls Day, Sequoias, Careers for Millennials

Counterterrorism, All Souls Day, Sequoias, Careers for Millennials

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Nov 2, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 1:43:26 mins
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Counterterror Strategy (1:04) Guest: Eric Schmitt, Senior Writer for the New York Times and Co-author of “Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda”  The Obama Administration is planning to send a small number of US ground troops to assist in the fight against ISIS in Syria. That’s a shift in the US policy toward ISIS, which for the last year has consisted mainly of air strikes and providing support to local forces.  All Souls Day/Art (22:50) Guest: Elliott Wise, Instructor of Art History at BYU  For the Christians who celebrate All Souls Day, it is a day to pray for, maybe even attempt to intercede for, the souls of loved ones who have passed away, in attempts to help their souls into heaven. In medieval times, art played a large role in purifying one’s own soul.  "The Descent from the Cross" by Rogier van der Weyden "Merode Altarpiece" by Robert Campin Sequoias and the Drought (37:36) Guest: Anthony Ambrose, PhD, Tree Biologist at UC Berkeley  The largest known living tree on the planet is named “General Sherman.” It’s a Giant Sequoia in California, tall as a 25-story skyscraper and 100 feet wide at the base. Picture a trunk larger than a pro-basketball court. General Sherman is estimated to be more than 2000 years old.  If you’ve visited Sequoia National Park, you felt how immense and permanent these trees seem. But might they have met their match in the record-breaking drought that grips California?  Career Help for Millennials (51:34) Guest: Craig Watkins, PhD, Professor of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas at Austin Millennials now comprise a larger share of the American workforce than any other population segment, according to 2015 Census data. The Pew Research Center says that means that one in three workers is between the ages of 18 and 34.  Millennials need a different kind of workplace. And, just as importantly, they’re entering the workforce in a very tough economy where stable, meaningful employment is elusive. So they’re getting creative about making a living, often on the margin of the traditional economy.  Prof. Watkins’ website to help Millennials develop careers can be found at www.doinginnovation.org.  Parent Previews: Holiday Preview (1:07:26) Guest: Rod Gustafson, Film Reviewer at ParentPreviews.com  It is officially acceptable to put up your holiday decorations, now that Halloween is over. So, Rod Gustafson of Parent Previews.com talks about what we can expect in theaters this holiday season.  Tech Transfer: Seed Coatings (1:20:48) Guests: Matthew Madsen, PhD, Professor of Plant Science at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Western wildfires have become more frequent and more intense in the last several decades – partly because of an invasive weed called cheat grass. It springs up fast and is unappetizing to cattle, sheep and wild birds like the sage grouse. So, come peak fire season, the cheat grass is prime tinder. And once a blaze sweeps through the range, what do you suppose grows back quickest?  Cheat grass, because it doesn’t need much water and it easily beats out native grasses.  Rangeland managers and researchers are spending millions of dollars in a race to give those native grasses a better chance.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

Episode Segments

Tech Transfer: Seed Coatings

23m

Guests: Matthew Madsen, PhD, Professor of Plant Science at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Western wildfires have become more frequent and more intense in the last several decades – partly because of an invasive weed called cheat grass. It springs up fast and is unappetizing to cattle, sheep and wild birds like the sage grouse. So, come peak fire season, the cheat grass is prime tinder. And once a blaze sweeps through the range, what do you suppose grows back quickest?  Cheat grass, because it doesn’t need much water and it easily beats out native grasses.  Rangeland managers and researchers are spending millions of dollars in a race to give those native grasses a better chance.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

Guests: Matthew Madsen, PhD, Professor of Plant Science at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office  Western wildfires have become more frequent and more intense in the last several decades – partly because of an invasive weed called cheat grass. It springs up fast and is unappetizing to cattle, sheep and wild birds like the sage grouse. So, come peak fire season, the cheat grass is prime tinder. And once a blaze sweeps through the range, what do you suppose grows back quickest?  Cheat grass, because it doesn’t need much water and it easily beats out native grasses.  Rangeland managers and researchers are spending millions of dollars in a race to give those native grasses a better chance.  More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.

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