Orlando Shooting, Postpartum Mood, Salmonella Turtles

Orlando Shooting, Postpartum Mood, Salmonella Turtles

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jun 13, 2016 9:00 pm
  • 1:39:02 mins

Profile of a Mass Shooter Guest: Michael Stone, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, Author of “The Anatomy of Evil” It’s the deadliest shooting rampage in U.S. history, leaving fifty people dead and more than fifty others wounded in a nightclub early Sunday morning.  Authorities say the gunman – a 29-year-old American-born citizen named Omar Mateen – appeared to be motivated by extremist propaganda online, but they have not found any links connecting him with radical groups like ISIS. President Obama earlier today called the shooting a case of “homegrown extremism.” Details about the shooter’s life and motives are still emerging, but the FBI says he had been on their radar in recent years for making comments to coworkers about terrorist groups and expressing a desire to martyr himself. FBI investigators determined he’d merely said those things out of anger because he felt like his coworkers were teasing him for being Muslim. Were those comments in fact key warning signs? What makes the difference between someone who says angry, hateful things and someone who takes a gun into a public place and kills scores of people? The Emily Effect: Postpartum Mood Disorders Guest: Eric Dyches, Founder of The Emily Effect in honor of his wife Emily Cook Dyches At least half a million women in the US suffer from postpartum depression every year – it is the most common complication of child birth. But only a tiny fraction of those women actually get professional help coping with what can be debilitating depression and anxiety brought on by dramatic changes in hormones, swirling emotions, the trauma of giving birth, and the exhaustion of caring for a newborn. Find resources and read the stories of other women coping with post-partum depression at www.TheEmilyEffect.org. Salmonella and Turtles Guest: Megin Nichols, Veterinarian at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention If you’re a sucker for pictures of cute little critters online, do not do a Google image search for “tiny turtles.” Then again, you’re probably better off looking at pictures of small turtles than actually buying one. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued a health warning that small turtles have been linked to four separate outbreaks of salmonella in the last year. More than 100 people in 26 states have been infected by the bacteria, which causes diarrhea, fever and cramps. Challenges Facing Cancer Survivors Guest: Niraj Gusani, MD, Oncologist and Founder of the Gastrointestinal Cancer Survivorship Clinic at the Penn State Cancer Institute Advances in cancer treatment and the longer lives Americans are living combine to mean millions upon millions of people are now “survivors of cancer.” By 2026, that survivor number is expected to reach 20 million people. Which is great news, because surviving cancer is better than succumbing. But surviving doesn’t mean the battle is over. There are lingering physical and emotional challenges that my next guest says are not being met by doctors very well today. Parent Previews – "Warcraft" and "Now You See Me 2" Guest: Rod Gustafson, Film Reviewer at ParentPreviews.com Rod Gustafson talks "Warcraft" and "Now You See Me 2." "Warcraft" features conflict between humans and orcs, and portrays the origin story of a hugely popular video game called World of Warcraft. Tech Transfer: Pre-eclampsia Intervention Guests: Juan Arroyo, PhD, Professor of Physiology and Developmental Biology at BYU; Mike Alder, Director of BYU’s Technology Transfer Office Fans of Downton Abbey will remember the tragic demise of Lord Grantham’s youngest daughter Lady Sybil, who died shortly after childbirth of a condition called “eclampsia.” Turns out that’s a real thing and it’s still killing women today. It accounts for between 40 and 60 percent of maternal deaths in developing countries. Here in the US the number is much lower. But globally as many as 1 in 10 women experience a pregnancy complication called “preeclampsia.” There’s no cure other than to deliver the fetus, and the cause remains a mystery. More information about technology developed at BYU is available at techtransfer.byu.edu.