How to be a Muslim, Solar Eclipsomania

How to be a Muslim, Solar Eclipsomania

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 620

  • Aug 18, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 1:43:32 mins

How to Be a Muslim: An American Story (originally aired Aug. 11, 2017)  Guest: Haroon Moghul, Fellow in Jewish-Muslim Relations, Shalom Hartman Institute, Author of “How to Be a Muslim: An American Story” Haroon Moghul’s new memoir is called “How to Be a Muslim,” but it’s not a how-to manual. It’s an exploration of Moghul’s struggle to find an identity as an American Muslim, the son of immigrants from Pakistan whose strict ideas about proper behavior and worship chafed him. As a teenager, he toyed with becoming an atheist, a Catholic, even a Mormon. But he came back to Islam, led a thriving Islamic Center for students at New York University, until the 9-11 terrorist attacks, and Americans developed a fear of Islam overnight. Haroon Moghul found himself thrust into the role of “professional Muslim,” expected to speak for—and justify—his faith at every turn. This memoir is, in some ways, an answer to that.  Get Ready for Eclipsomania (originally aired Aug. 11, 2017)  Guests: Tyler Nordgren, PhD, Professor of Physics and Astronomy, University of Redlands, Author of “Sun, Moon, Earth: The History of Solar Eclipses from Omens of Doom to Einstein and Exoplanets”; Mike Joner, PhD, Research Professor of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University; Patrick Wiggins, NASA Solar System Ambassador I’m sure you’ve heard by now that a total eclipse of the sun will be visible from the United States on Monday, August 21. A chance like this only comes around once or twice in a lifetime, unless you’re one of those people who actually chases solar eclipses and travels to wherever the best view will be in the world. We’re going to talk to a couple of those people this hour to understand what the fuss is all about. By the end, you just might be making plans to high-tail it to the “zone of totality” which stretches diagonally across the US from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. BONUS Curious Remedies (originally aired March 30, 2017)  Guest: Meg Frost, Physiological Sciences Librarian, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University For this month’s installment of From the Vaults, we’ve taken a little field trip across the BYU campus to travel back in time to the 16th Century, when visiting the doctor was not a sterile or sanitized experience. We’re here, in the lobby of the Harold B. Lee Library, where, behind a tall black curtain just inside the main entrance, the world of Renaissance Medicine comes alive. The exhibit is called Curious Remedies, and in it we’re introduced to mysterious powders, surgical tools that look like instruments of torture, fantastic masks, lots of blood, and leeches.