Myanmar Ethnic Cleansing, Exercise Incentives, Men "Marry Up"

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 637

  • Sep 12, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 1:44:12 mins

Three World Events: UN Sanctions on NK, Ethnic Cleansing in Myanmar, Independence Referenda Guest: Quinn Mecham, PhD, Professor of Political Science, Brigham Young University  Why sanctions won't work against North Korea; the roots of ethnic cleansing in Myanmar; referenda on independence in Kurdish Iraq and in Catalonia, Spain.  Money Won't Get You to the Gym Guest: Mark Stehr, PhD, Associate Professor of Economics, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University Do you think you would go to the gym more if you got paid to do it? Think again. A new study indicates that money has very little effect on American exercise habits.  Young Athletes in Danger Guest: Neeru Jayanthi, MD, Sports Medicine Physician, Emory University Tiger Woods started golfing at the age of three. Serena Williams picked up her first tennis racket at the age of four and went pro at 14. Swimmer Missy Franklin had won four Olympic gold medals by the age of 17. The message is clear – great athletes start young. But Tiger, Serena and Missy have also all experienced serious injuries related to their sport. Dr. Neeru Jayanthi studies injuries in young athletes and says the risk seems to be increasing as more and more kids specialize in one sport from an early age.  A New Digital Handshake Guest: Amy Schmitz, JD, Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law Has this ever happened to you? You spend $15 on a bottle of hair product online that turns out to be a knock off of the real thing. You can't find any contact info on the website to log your complaint, so after about 20 minutes of angry searching for a way to reach someone at the company, you drop it and vow to be smarter about buying stuff from random websites. Maybe you worked harder to get a refund because your purchase was worth more than $15. Still, it's a huge hassle. Where customer service is concerned, the web is still pretty much the Wild West and sellers count on you not having the time or resources to follow through on a complaint. But we may be at a tipping point. Online purchasing is so ubiquitous that customers and regulators are beginning to call for dispute resolution standards.  Schooling Isn't Learning Guest: Lant Pritchett, PhD, Professor of International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University One of the great international development success stories of the last century is the fact that today practically every child in the world enrolls in school, and most attend at least to the end of primary school. Getting to this place has taken a consistent, global effort. But, for all that schooling, kids are not learning. There are some 250 million children around the world unable to read, write or do basic math and more than half of them are in school.  We have a learning crisis. Men Marrying Up Guest: Arthur Sakamoto, PhD, Professor of Sociology, Texas A&M University In your grandmother's time, women might have claimed to go to college just to pursue a "MRS" degree. But that's a byegone era and women now earn more bachelor's degrees than men do. Turns out, in a marriage, husbands are benefitting more from their wives' education than the women themselves are. New research out of Texas A&M reveals that there's an unexpected consequence of women's success in the workplace.

Episode Segments

A New Digital Handshake

18 MINS

Guest: Amy Schmitz, JD, Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law Has this ever happened to you? You spend $15 on a bottle of hair product online that turns out to be a knock off of the real thing. You can't find any contact info on the website to log your complaint, so after about 20 minutes of angry searching for a way to reach someone at the company, you drop it and vow to be smarter about buying stuff from random websites. Maybe you worked harder to get a refund because your purchase was worth more than $15. Still, it's a huge hassle. Where customer service is concerned, the web is still pretty much the Wild West and sellers count on you not having the time or resources to follow through on a complaint. But we may be at a tipping point. Online purchasing is so ubiquitous that customers and regulators are beginning to call for dispute resolution standards.

Guest: Amy Schmitz, JD, Professor of Law, University of Missouri School of Law Has this ever happened to you? You spend $15 on a bottle of hair product online that turns out to be a knock off of the real thing. You can't find any contact info on the website to log your complaint, so after about 20 minutes of angry searching for a way to reach someone at the company, you drop it and vow to be smarter about buying stuff from random websites. Maybe you worked harder to get a refund because your purchase was worth more than $15. Still, it's a huge hassle. Where customer service is concerned, the web is still pretty much the Wild West and sellers count on you not having the time or resources to follow through on a complaint. But we may be at a tipping point. Online purchasing is so ubiquitous that customers and regulators are beginning to call for dispute resolution standards.