• Apr 14, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 26:12 mins

Guest: Angelia Trujillo, teaches forensic nursing at the University of Alaska Anchorage, School of Nursing and is author of the article, "A Practical Guide to Prevention for Forensic Nursing," which was published in the Journal of Forensic Nursing By the time a forensic nurse gets involved in a sexual assault case, the crime has already been committed, the physical and emotional damage already done. The forensic nurse collects evidence from the victim's body, takes photographs and helps police find and prosecute the perpetrator. But University of Alaska Anchorage nursing professor Angelia Trujillo is training her forensic nursing students to do more and an article she published in the Journal of Forensic Nursing last year has prompted many in her field to take a closer look at their role in preventing violence, rather than merely treating its aftermath.

Other Segments

Light Cigarettes

13 MINS

Guest: Greta Hsu, associate professor of management at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management. She led the study on light cigarettes published in the American Sociological Review Labels matter a lot. A snack food says "low-fat" or "low sugar" and we are instantly convinced it is good for us. An apple labeled "organic" conjures a pastoral orchard scene where everything is done naturally and by hand. Research by sociologist Greta Hsu at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management finds companies have increasingly taken advantage of our willingness to believe such claims, even as they are changing the composition of their products to be less healthy. Her latest research, published in the American Sociological Review, investigates how the tobacco industry has manipulated consumers of "light" cigarettes.

Guest: Greta Hsu, associate professor of management at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management. She led the study on light cigarettes published in the American Sociological Review Labels matter a lot. A snack food says "low-fat" or "low sugar" and we are instantly convinced it is good for us. An apple labeled "organic" conjures a pastoral orchard scene where everything is done naturally and by hand. Research by sociologist Greta Hsu at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management finds companies have increasingly taken advantage of our willingness to believe such claims, even as they are changing the composition of their products to be less healthy. Her latest research, published in the American Sociological Review, investigates how the tobacco industry has manipulated consumers of "light" cigarettes.