Tobacco Ads Admit Addiction, Wild West Tours Europe

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 693

  • Nov 30, 2017
  • 1:39:24 mins

Tobacco Advertises Danger of Cigarettes  Guest: Stanton Glantz, PhD, Truth Initiative Distinguished Professor of Tobacco Control, University of California, San Francisco, and Director of the UCSF Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education A jarring series of advertisements began airing on network TV, online and an in print this week, paid for by US tobacco companies.   “Smoking kills on average 1,200 Americans every day,” reads one ad. “More people die every year from smoking than from murder, AIDS, suicide, drugs, car crashes and alcohol, combined.” Another one says, “RJ Reynolds Tobacco, Philip Morris USA, Altria and Lorillard, intentionally designed cigarettes to make them more addictive.”  The ads are pretty basic: that slightly robotic voice reads as black text appears on a white background. They’ve been a long time coming, too. A judge actually ordered tobacco companies to air these so-called “corrective statements” ten years ago.  You can read the internal documents tobacco companies have been court-ordered to release here: https://www.industrydocumentslibrary.ucsf.edu/ Seeing More at Night Vision Guests: Diane Cook, Landscape Photographer; Len Jenshel, Landscape Photographer “The night is more alive and more richly colored than the day.” Vincent van Gogh apparently said that once, and his famous Starry Night painting certainly makes the point. So does a new coffee table book from National Geographic called “Night Vision: Magical Photographs of Life After Dark.” Lunar Colony in Sight Guest: Jay Melosh, PhD, Distinguished University Professor of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University It’s been 46 years since an American astronaut last set foot on the moon. Vice President Mike Pence told the National Space Council meeting last month that’s going to change: “We will return American astronauts to the moon. Not only to leave behind footprints and flags, but to build the foundation we need to send Americans to Mars and beyond.” He’s talking about setting up a more permanent presence on the Moon. A place where humans can train and stage supplies for missions farther out in space. So researchers are trying to find the perfect spot to build a lunar base. And new research published jointly by Japanese and American scientists points to an intriguing option – a giant underground cavern on the moon.  Stories from The Apple Seed Guest: Sam Payne, Host, The Apple Seed, BYUradio Prince Harry's Thoroughly Modern Match is Just What the Royals Need Guest: Gregory Jackson, PhD, Assistant Professor of Integrated Studies, Utah Valley University, and Podcast Host, “History That Doesn’t Suck”  A spring wedding is the works for Britain’s Prince Harry and American actress Meghan Markle. The match highlights a modern shift in the House of Windsor. Not only is Markle American, she’s also divorced from a previous husband. The last time a member of Britain’s royal family tried marrying an American divorcee, he was forced to abdicate the throne, which made way for Queen Elizabeth to ultimately wear the crown. And now Queen Elizabeth says she’s “delighted” at her grandson’s wedding news. The Wild West Tours Europe Guest: Frank Christianson, PhD, Associate Dean, College of Humanities, BYU, Senior Editor of the Papers of William F. Cody Project based at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West When President Trump rallies crowds with his promise to “Make America Great Again,” he’s harking back to a time in the last century when America first came into its own on the world stage as an undisputed political, military and cultural power. The 20th century has been called “The American Century” for those reasons.  A showman in a leather fringe coat and jaunty cowboy hat helped pave the way for America’s cultural dominance. In the late 1800s, Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West show toured the world shaping the story of America we still tell today – hard working and destined for greatness.  A forthcoming book called “The Popular Frontier” traces the influence of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show. It’s edited by Frank Christianson, an Associate Dean of the College of Humanities here at BYU. He is also the senior editor of the Papers of William F. Cody Project based at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West.

Episode Segments

Lunar Colony in Sight

20 MINS

Guest: Jay Melosh, PhD, Distinguished University Professor of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University It’s been 46 years since an American astronaut last set foot on the moon. Vice President Mike Pence told the National Space Council meeting last month that’s going to change: “We will return American astronauts to the moon. Not only to leave behind footprints and flags, but to build the foundation we need to send Americans to Mars and beyond.” He’s talking about setting up a more permanent presence on the Moon. A place where humans can train and stage supplies for missions farther out in space. So researchers are trying to find the perfect spot to build a lunar base. And new research published jointly by Japanese and American scientists points to an intriguing option – a giant underground cavern on the moon.

Guest: Jay Melosh, PhD, Distinguished University Professor of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Purdue University It’s been 46 years since an American astronaut last set foot on the moon. Vice President Mike Pence told the National Space Council meeting last month that’s going to change: “We will return American astronauts to the moon. Not only to leave behind footprints and flags, but to build the foundation we need to send Americans to Mars and beyond.” He’s talking about setting up a more permanent presence on the Moon. A place where humans can train and stage supplies for missions farther out in space. So researchers are trying to find the perfect spot to build a lunar base. And new research published jointly by Japanese and American scientists points to an intriguing option – a giant underground cavern on the moon.