Iran Nuclear Deal, Ancient Greek "Computer," Implicit Bias

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 807

  • May 8, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 1:43:38 mins

US Quits Iran Nuclear Deal Guest: Lawrence Wilkerson, Retired US Army Colonel, Former Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Colonel Powell, Adjunct Professor of Government and Public Policy, College of William and Mary This afternoon, President Donald Trump did what he’s been promising to do since he took office – pulled the US out of the Iran nuclear agreement, which he called “defective at its core.” In pulling out of the agreement, President Trump says the US will “impose the highest level of economic sanctions” on Iran. The nuclear deal signed in 2015 restricted Iran’s nuclear capabilities in exchange for lifting sanctions that had crippled its economy.  New Leather Coating Guest: Bharat Bhushan, PhD, Ohio Eminent Scholar and the Howard D. Winbigler Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering If you’ve ever driven in a car with leather seats in the heat of summer, you’ll know the discomfort of sticky leather seats. Not to mention, they stain really easily. Professor Bharat Bhushan has created a special elixir in his engineering lab at The Ohio State University. It’s a liquid coating he sprays on fake leather to make it super-water-proof, self-cleaning, and less sticky when it’s hot outside. The Ancient Greek “Computer” Guest: Alexander Jones, PhD, Professor of the History of the Exact Sciences in Antiquity and Director of the New York University Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, and Author of “A Portable Cosmos: Revealing the Antikythera Mechanism, Scientific Wonder of the Ancient World” The most sophisticated piece of machinery ever discovered from ancient Greece is a two-thousand-year-old box of bronze gears. It was made centuries before the first geared clocks would be built in Europe. But this ancient Greek device doesn’t keep time in the hourly-sense of the word. It’s more about Time, with a capital T. The Associated Press has called it a “philosopher’s guide to the galaxy” with its spinning gears that show the movement of planets, the moon and the sun. While this device was pulled from a shipwreck more than 100 years ago, it’s only been in the last few years that scientists and historians have begun to crack its secrets, thanks to high-end scanning and imaging technology. What they’ve learned sheds new light on both ancient Greece and the modern world.  Implicit Bias Guest: Calvin Lai, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis On Tuesday, May 29, all the standalone Starbucks stores in the country will close for a few hours in the afternoon “for a mandatory training around unconscious bias.” That announcement came from Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson a few days after a manager in a Philadelphia Starbucks called police on two black men who were waiting for a friend but hadn’t ordered anything. Video of the men being arrested by police went viral, prompting national outrage and an apology from Starbucks. But what’s this “unconscious bias” training the company’s baristas will now be required to take? And what difference might it make? Buried Treasure and King Bluetooth Guest: Anders Winroth, PhD, Birgit Baldwin Professor of History at Yale University, Author of “The Age of the Vikings” At the start of the year, an amateur archaeologist and his 13-year-old student were metal detecting on an island in the Baltic Sea in northern Germany. They found what they thought was just some aluminum. But it turned out to be silver – a stash, in fact, of Viking treasure with historical significance tied to an ancient king. How Closed Captions Work Guest: Theresa Raymond, Closed Caption Coordinator, BYUtv Have you ever wondered how closed captioning works? Is someone sitting at a keyboard at that very moment typing the words you see on the screen? Theresa Raymond of BYUtv happens to work in the same building, so we brought her over to give us an inside look at how it works. We started with the most intense part of her team’s job – doing captions for live television shows like BYU SportsNation which airs weekdays at noon Eastern on BYUtv.

Episode Segments

Implicit Bias

17 MINS

Guest: Calvin Lai, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis On Tuesday, May 29, all the standalone Starbucks stores in the country will close for a few hours in the afternoon “for a mandatory training around unconscious bias.” That announcement came from Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson a few days after a manager in a Philadelphia Starbucks called police on two black men who were waiting for a friend but hadn’t ordered anything. Video of the men being arrested by police went viral, prompting national outrage and an apology from Starbucks. But what’s this “unconscious bias” training the company’s baristas will now be required to take? And what difference might it make?

Guest: Calvin Lai, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis On Tuesday, May 29, all the standalone Starbucks stores in the country will close for a few hours in the afternoon “for a mandatory training around unconscious bias.” That announcement came from Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson a few days after a manager in a Philadelphia Starbucks called police on two black men who were waiting for a friend but hadn’t ordered anything. Video of the men being arrested by police went viral, prompting national outrage and an apology from Starbucks. But what’s this “unconscious bias” training the company’s baristas will now be required to take? And what difference might it make?