"Same Kind of Different as Me" and "Only the Brave"

"Same Kind of Different as Me" and "Only the Brave"

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 671 , Segment 5

Episode: War Authorization, Volcanoes and the Nile, Gerrymandering

  • Oct 30, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 12:15 mins

Guest: Rod Gustafson, Reviewer at Parent Previews “Same Kind of Different as Me” is based on a book by the same name that tells the story of a wealthy white couple struggling with their marriage who befriend a homeless African American man. “Only the Brave” is based on a true story about the elite wildfire fighting unit called the Granite Mountain Hotshots.

Other Segments

Congress Debates War Authorization Power

22 MINS

Guest: Ryan Vogel, JD, PhD, Professor of International Law, Director of Center for National Security Studies, Utah Valley University US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are currently testifying on Capitol Hill about something called an AUMF. It stands for Authorization for Use of Military Force, and, in 2001, Congress passed one allowing the President to go after Al Qaeda for carrying out the 9-11 terror attack. Sixteen years later, the US is battling terror across the Middle East and in Africa under that same authorization. But the foes have changed: ISIS, Al-Shabbab, Boko Haram—and with the recent death of four US soldiers in Niger, there are questions about whether that original authorization to go to war still applies.

Guest: Ryan Vogel, JD, PhD, Professor of International Law, Director of Center for National Security Studies, Utah Valley University US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are currently testifying on Capitol Hill about something called an AUMF. It stands for Authorization for Use of Military Force, and, in 2001, Congress passed one allowing the President to go after Al Qaeda for carrying out the 9-11 terror attack. Sixteen years later, the US is battling terror across the Middle East and in Africa under that same authorization. But the foes have changed: ISIS, Al-Shabbab, Boko Haram—and with the recent death of four US soldiers in Niger, there are questions about whether that original authorization to go to war still applies.

When is Gerrymandering Legal?

23 MINS

Guest: Jonathan Entin, JD, Professor Emeritus of Law and Political Science, Case Western Reserve University School of Law When the Supreme Court heard arguments about gerrymandering earlier this month, protesters gathered outside holding signs that read, “Voters choose their Representatives, not the other way around.” Can’t argue with that, right? But voting districts are redrawn every ten years by whichever party is in control of a state’s legislature at that moment. And there are lots of ways to tweak the boundaries of a district to improve your party’s chances of winning in the next election. Politicians have been doing this for centuries. But suddenly the Supreme Court is weighing in on whether it’s legal. Why? And why now?

Guest: Jonathan Entin, JD, Professor Emeritus of Law and Political Science, Case Western Reserve University School of Law When the Supreme Court heard arguments about gerrymandering earlier this month, protesters gathered outside holding signs that read, “Voters choose their Representatives, not the other way around.” Can’t argue with that, right? But voting districts are redrawn every ten years by whichever party is in control of a state’s legislature at that moment. And there are lots of ways to tweak the boundaries of a district to improve your party’s chances of winning in the next election. Politicians have been doing this for centuries. But suddenly the Supreme Court is weighing in on whether it’s legal. Why? And why now?