Potential Antidote to CO Poisoning

Potential Antidote to CO Poisoning

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Self-Awareness, Pirate Next Door, End of Obamacare?

Episode: Self-Awareness, Pirate Next Door, End of Obamacare?

  • May 25, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 15:49 mins

(Originally Aired Jan 25, 2017) Guest: Mark Gladwin, MD, Chair of the Department of Medicine and Director of the Pittsburgh Heart, Lung, Blood, and Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh Thousands of people every year are sent to the emergency room as a result of carbon monoxide poisoning, often from a heater, generator, or fireplace. Carbon monoxide is invisible – you can’t taste, smell or see it. There’s no known antidote for it, but research led by critical care physician/scientist Mark Gladwin at the University of Pittsburg School of Medicine has discovered a promising lead. They were able to reverse a fatal dose of carbon monoxide in mice by giving them a mutated brain protein they’ve made in the lab.

Other Segments

The Pirate Next Door—Myths and Unexpected Truths

19m

(originally aired March 20, 2017) Guest: Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos, DLS, Author of “The Pirate Next Door: The Untold Story of Eighteenth Century Pirates' Wives, Families and Communities” Captain Jack Sparrow is back in theaters this weekend with all his swashbuckling swagger in the fifth installment of Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise, “Dead Men Tell No Tales.” Thanks in part to characters like Jack Sparrow, when we think of pirates, we tend to think about peg-legged men with parrots on their shoulders who are either drunk, immoral, or both. But, even in the “Golden Age” of piracy, it wasn’t exactly like that. In fact, the legendary pirate captains of the time were often just regular men—active participants in society pushed by economic forces to take a risky career path

(originally aired March 20, 2017) Guest: Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos, DLS, Author of “The Pirate Next Door: The Untold Story of Eighteenth Century Pirates' Wives, Families and Communities” Captain Jack Sparrow is back in theaters this weekend with all his swashbuckling swagger in the fifth installment of Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise, “Dead Men Tell No Tales.” Thanks in part to characters like Jack Sparrow, when we think of pirates, we tend to think about peg-legged men with parrots on their shoulders who are either drunk, immoral, or both. But, even in the “Golden Age” of piracy, it wasn’t exactly like that. In fact, the legendary pirate captains of the time were often just regular men—active participants in society pushed by economic forces to take a risky career path

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