From Leisurely to Busy: A Symbol of Status

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Mar 28, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 15:47 mins

Guest: Neeru Paharia, Assistant Professor of Business, Georgetown University  A show called, “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous” was popular in America in the 1980s. On the show, conspicuous consumption and leisure time were the hallmarks of extraordinary wealth. You knew you’d arrived if you could buy anything you wanted and spend your time lounging on a yacht, not having to lift a finger. But somewhere in the last 30 years, there’s a been a shift in America toward busyness as a symbol of status. It’s all over social media, if you know what to look for. It’s also probably part of your own habits. When somebody asks how you’re doing, what’s your response? I bet “busy” comes up a lot.

Other Segments

Tweets Shaping Politics

25 MINS

Guest: Jonathan Supovitz, Director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education, University of Pennsylvania Social media has been touted as a great democratizing force: everyone has access to the same platform, so everyone has an equal voice, right?  But that assumes we’re all equally savvy about wielding our influence on social media. And one look at my 1,200 followers on Twitter compared to President Trump’s 27 million is proof some people have a much bigger megaphone.  A very cool project out of the University of Pennsylvania has mapped exactly how influence works on social media during debates over hot topics like the Common Core standards. Their work also uncovered some surprises about how particularly savvy users can hi-jack a debate to flood the system with their views and drive policies in their favor.  Check out the Common Core debate analysis here.

Guest: Jonathan Supovitz, Director of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education, University of Pennsylvania Social media has been touted as a great democratizing force: everyone has access to the same platform, so everyone has an equal voice, right?  But that assumes we’re all equally savvy about wielding our influence on social media. And one look at my 1,200 followers on Twitter compared to President Trump’s 27 million is proof some people have a much bigger megaphone.  A very cool project out of the University of Pennsylvania has mapped exactly how influence works on social media during debates over hot topics like the Common Core standards. Their work also uncovered some surprises about how particularly savvy users can hi-jack a debate to flood the system with their views and drive policies in their favor.  Check out the Common Core debate analysis here.