Video Game Addiction and Technology in Africa

Video Game Addiction and Technology in Africa

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode 130

  • Aug 28, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 1:41:31 mins

Video Game Addiction (1:03) Guests: Brett Merrill, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist; Joseph Hilgard, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Annenberg Public Policy Center; Douglas Gentile, Ph.D., Developmental Psychologist  Video Games represent one of the largest entertainment industries in the world– here in the US, some 34 million people play at least 5 hours a week. But few players stop at just 5 hours.  The average time spent playing is 22-hours.  That’s the equivalent of a part-time job spent playing in the virtual worlds of games like World of Warcraft, Call of Duty or even Minecraft. So, perhaps it’s no surprise that people are now being diagnosed with an addiction to video gaming. People lose jobs, destroy relationships and develop severe health problems as a result of too much time spent gaming. This hour we’re talking about the power – and price – of video game playing.  Technology in Africa (50:10) Guests: Gabriel Senay, Ph.D., Physical Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center; Dan Nielson, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Chair of Political Science at Brigham Young University; Guy Grossman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania; Michelle Larsen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine  Information is power, and nowhere is that more apparent than in Africa, where the explosion of new technology is making information more available than ever before. The use of personal technology, including cell phones, is changing banking in Africa, as well as energy, medicine, politics and even agriculture.

Episode Segments

Video Game Addiction

49 MINS

Guests: Brett Merrill, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist; Joseph Hilgard, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Annenberg Public Policy Center; Douglas Gentile, Ph.D., Developmental Psychologist  Video Games represent one of the largest entertainment industries in the world– here in the US, some 34 million people play at least 5 hours a week. But few players stop at just 5 hours.  The average time spent playing is 22-hours.  That’s the equivalent of a part-time job spent playing in the virtual worlds of games like World of Warcraft, Call of Duty or even Minecraft. So, perhaps it’s no surprise that people are now being diagnosed with an addiction to video gaming. People lose jobs, destroy relationships and develop severe health problems as a result of too much time spent gaming. This hour we’re talking about the power – and price – of video game playing.

Guests: Brett Merrill, Ph.D., Clinical Psychologist; Joseph Hilgard, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Annenberg Public Policy Center; Douglas Gentile, Ph.D., Developmental Psychologist  Video Games represent one of the largest entertainment industries in the world– here in the US, some 34 million people play at least 5 hours a week. But few players stop at just 5 hours.  The average time spent playing is 22-hours.  That’s the equivalent of a part-time job spent playing in the virtual worlds of games like World of Warcraft, Call of Duty or even Minecraft. So, perhaps it’s no surprise that people are now being diagnosed with an addiction to video gaming. People lose jobs, destroy relationships and develop severe health problems as a result of too much time spent gaming. This hour we’re talking about the power – and price – of video game playing.

Technology in Africa

51 MINS

Guests: Gabriel Senay, Ph.D., Physical Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center; Dan Nielson, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Chair of Political Science at Brigham Young University; Guy Grossman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania; Michelle Larsen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine  Information is power, and nowhere is that more apparent than in Africa, where the explosion of new technology is making information more available than ever before. The use of personal technology, including cell phones, is changing banking in Africa, as well as energy, medicine, politics and even agriculture.

Guests: Gabriel Senay, Ph.D., Physical Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center; Dan Nielson, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Chair of Political Science at Brigham Young University; Guy Grossman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania; Michelle Larsen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine  Information is power, and nowhere is that more apparent than in Africa, where the explosion of new technology is making information more available than ever before. The use of personal technology, including cell phones, is changing banking in Africa, as well as energy, medicine, politics and even agriculture.