Public Option

Public Option

The Matt Townsend Show - Season 1, Episode 1231 , Segment 1

Episode: Public Option, Power of Likability, Invest in Robots

  • Jul 1, 2017 4:00 pm
  • 51:58 mins

Jacob S. Hacker the “father of the public option” and a professor of Political Science at Yale University.  He is the co-author of American Amnesia: How the War on Government Led Us to Forget What Made America Prosper. Secretary Tom Price of the US Health and Human Services is currently traveling the country as he tries to meet with business leaders and citizens to ensure them that they will not lose their health coverage.  This listening tour coincides with the Republicans quick push to fix Obamacare.  While politicians drag this process out, we need to ask an important question:  Is there a simpler way to fix Obamacare?  Jacob Hacker explains.

Other Segments

Popular: The Power of Likability

46m

Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D. is a husband, a father, board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology, and serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Popularity is a word that can bring to life memories of our teenage years. Mostly it involves feelings of insecurity, stress, and the desire to be liked, whether you were popular or not. Thankfully we can say that those years are behind and thank goodness we don’t have to deal with that anymore. Social psychologists would argue that it isn’t true. In his new book “Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World” Dr. Mitch Prinstein addresses some of the misconceptions we have about “popularity”.

Mitch Prinstein, Ph.D. is a husband, a father, board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology, and serves as the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, and the Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Popularity is a word that can bring to life memories of our teenage years. Mostly it involves feelings of insecurity, stress, and the desire to be liked, whether you were popular or not. Thankfully we can say that those years are behind and thank goodness we don’t have to deal with that anymore. Social psychologists would argue that it isn’t true. In his new book “Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World” Dr. Mitch Prinstein addresses some of the misconceptions we have about “popularity”.