• Apr 6, 2015 9:00 pm
  • 15:51 mins

Guest: Marcus Butts, lead researcher of study and associate professor of Management at the University of Texas at Arlington  Smartphones and remote access to the company network have changed the way we work. We are always connected - and many employees, it turns out, actually get angry when they get a work email at home after hours. A new study of more than 300 working adults published in the Academy of Management Journal explains the perils of the increasingly common corporate policy that employees are essentially always on call and expected to check email. There are obvious downsides, but some surprising upsides, too.

Other Segments

Civil War Photographs

13 MINS

Guest: Bob Zeller, president of the Center for Civil War Photography We recently learned about a trove of remarkable photos documenting life before and during the Civil War that has arrived at the Library of Congress and is being digitized for people to view online. The pictures themselves are remarkable, but so, too, is the story of how they came to be in a single collection. The photos offer a glimpse at daily life of southern slaves before the war and extend all the way to a shot of Abraham Lincoln's Illinois home draped in a black-and-white mourning cloth after his assassination. The Library of Congress announced last week it had acquired more than 500 of these images from the collection of an 87-year-old Texas grandmother.

Guest: Bob Zeller, president of the Center for Civil War Photography We recently learned about a trove of remarkable photos documenting life before and during the Civil War that has arrived at the Library of Congress and is being digitized for people to view online. The pictures themselves are remarkable, but so, too, is the story of how they came to be in a single collection. The photos offer a glimpse at daily life of southern slaves before the war and extend all the way to a shot of Abraham Lincoln's Illinois home draped in a black-and-white mourning cloth after his assassination. The Library of Congress announced last week it had acquired more than 500 of these images from the collection of an 87-year-old Texas grandmother.