• Apr 5, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 19:13 mins

Guest: David Garrow, PhD, Pulitzer Prize-winning Author of “Bearing the Cross” Martin Luther King Jr. is often remembered for the soaring optimism of his “I Have a Dream” speech in the March on Washington. By the time he was assassinated on April 4, 1968, it had been five years since that march. The Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act had both passed in Congress. So, at the point of his assassination, did Dr. King feel his dream had been accomplished? With the 50th anniversary of his assassination, we explore Dr. King’s legacy.

Other Segments

John Wompas: American Indian, Real Estate Mogul, Swindler

52 MINS

(Originally aired on Nov. 10, 2017) Guest: Jenny Hale Pulsipher, PhD, Associate Professor, History, Brigham Young University, Author, “Swindler Sachem: The American Indian Who Sold His Birthright, Dropped Out of Harvard, and Conned the King of England” out in June 2018 from Yale University Press The story of a fascinating American Indian starts about a decade after English settlers and the Wampanoag Indians gathered for a harvest festival we now consider the first Thanksgiving. John Wompas was born around 1637 near what today is Grafton, Massachusetts. He was a Nipmuc Indian, but he didn’t come from any royal lineage in the tribe. His father was not a chief – or “sachem,” as the tribe’s leaders were called. And yet, John Wompas would become prominent in both Nipmuc and English communities. He would study at Harvard. Become the first Indian involved in the transatlantic sea trade

(Originally aired on Nov. 10, 2017) Guest: Jenny Hale Pulsipher, PhD, Associate Professor, History, Brigham Young University, Author, “Swindler Sachem: The American Indian Who Sold His Birthright, Dropped Out of Harvard, and Conned the King of England” out in June 2018 from Yale University Press The story of a fascinating American Indian starts about a decade after English settlers and the Wampanoag Indians gathered for a harvest festival we now consider the first Thanksgiving. John Wompas was born around 1637 near what today is Grafton, Massachusetts. He was a Nipmuc Indian, but he didn’t come from any royal lineage in the tribe. His father was not a chief – or “sachem,” as the tribe’s leaders were called. And yet, John Wompas would become prominent in both Nipmuc and English communities. He would study at Harvard. Become the first Indian involved in the transatlantic sea trade