Suicide and Altitude, Why You Like What You Like, Screen Cleaning

Suicide and Altitude, Why You Like What You Like, Screen Cleaning

The Matt Townsend Show - Season 1, Episode 1470

  • Apr 6, 2018 4:00 pm
  • 2:23:27 mins

Suicide Rates and Altitude (10:55) Brent Michael Kious, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah. He practices inpatient adult psychiatry with a focus on the management of severe persistent mental illness. His outpatient practice focuses on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions, and the use of deep brain stimulation for treatment-refractory OCD.  Dr.  Brent Michael Kious He also works at the University of Utah as an Adjunct Professor in Internal Medicine, Neurology, and Philosophy.  A team of scientists from the University of Utah led by Dr. Brent Michael Kious have come to the conclusion that people living at higher altitudes may have an increased risk of suicide. The researchers have a theory as to why this might be the case, along with some recommendations. Dr. Kious explains. Why You Like What You Like (57:27) Tom Vanderbilt is a contributing Editor at Wired (U.K.), Outside, and Artforum and the author of New York Times Best Seller: Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do. Tom Vanderbilt is also the author of You May Also Like: Taste in an Age of Endless Choice. Tom Vanderbilt explains why we like what we like. Jeff Simpson - Screen Cleaning (1:33:46) Jeff Simpson talks about movies and TV helping you find family-friendly options.

Episode Segments

Suicide Rates and Altitude

47 MINS

Brent Michael Kious, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah. He practices inpatient adult psychiatry with a focus on the management of severe persistent mental illness. His outpatient practice focuses on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions, and the use of deep brain stimulation for treatment-refractory OCD.  Dr.  Brent Michael Kious He also works at the University of Utah as an Adjunct Professor in Internal Medicine, Neurology, and Philosophy.  A team of scientists from the University of Utah led by Dr. Brent Michael Kious have come to the conclusion that people living at higher altitudes may have an increased risk of suicide. The researchers have a theory as to why this might be the case, along with some recommendations. Dr. Kious explains.

Brent Michael Kious, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Utah. He practices inpatient adult psychiatry with a focus on the management of severe persistent mental illness. His outpatient practice focuses on obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related conditions, and the use of deep brain stimulation for treatment-refractory OCD.  Dr.  Brent Michael Kious He also works at the University of Utah as an Adjunct Professor in Internal Medicine, Neurology, and Philosophy.  A team of scientists from the University of Utah led by Dr. Brent Michael Kious have come to the conclusion that people living at higher altitudes may have an increased risk of suicide. The researchers have a theory as to why this might be the case, along with some recommendations. Dr. Kious explains.