Title IX, Protests, Wilderness Survival Exam

Title IX, Protests, Wilderness Survival Exam

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

  • Jun 8, 2020 8:00 pm
  • 1:44:30 mins

New Federal Rules on School Handling of Sexual Misconduct - The Argument For (0:32) Guest: Joe Cohn, Legislative & Policy Director, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education The US Department of Education recently issued new rules for how schools must investigate and discipline cases of sexual harassment and assault. This responsibility, that schools of all levels have, falls under a law called Title IX which prohibits sex discrimination. How that law applies to assault and harassment has been under a lot of scrutiny in recent years. The Obama Administration advised schools to ramp up investigations of sexual misconduct and threatened to withdraw federal funds from schools that failed to. The Trump Administration rescinded that advice and has now issued new rules that take effect in August. New Federal Rules on School Handling of Sexual Misconduct – The Argument Against (13:34) Guest: Shiwali Patel, Senior Counsel and Director of Justice for Student Survivors, National Women’s Law Center Let’s get an opposing view now on these new rules issued by the Trump Administration about how schools should handle claims of sexual assault or harassment. The national Women's Law Center is challenging the new rules in court.  Nonviolent Protests Are Historically More Efficient Than Violent Ones (26:40) Guest: Omar Wasow, Professor of Politics, Princeton University. Nonviolent protest – does it work? Understand what change comes of protests like this...ongoing. Largely peaceful. Moved beyond the violence. Protests have been sweeping the country following a string of deaths of black people, most recently the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, MN. These recent protests have stark similarity to those during the height of the Civil Rights movement in the late 1960s. But do these protests make any political change? What about protests that turn violent? The answer has a lot to do with media coverage. Little Free Libraries Become Little Free Pantries During the Pandemic (43:21) Guest: Margret Aldrich, Director of Communications at Little Free Library, Author of the Little Free Library Book Little Free Library is the world-wide movement where people build book sharing boxes in their yards – they look like oversized birdhouses and there are thousands of them worldwide. Right now, many of those have converted into pantries offering free food and supplies instead of books. Special Series: Navigating Disagreements as Communities Reopen (52:14) Today we begin a series of conversations throughout the week about how our listeners are navigating the conflicts that arise during the uncertain reopening period of the pandemic. So many of the details have been left up to us as individual to decide what’s safe and what’s not for ourselves and our families.  Listener Story: Uncertain About Returning to Church (53:27) Listener Story: Bringing Employees Back to Work Safely (1:03:36) Middle Schoolers in Alaska Take a Camping Trip Instead of a Final Exam (1:13:17) Guest: Frankie Urquhart, Science Teacher, Schoenbar Middle School For more than 40 years, 8th grade students at Schoenbar Middle School in Alaska have taken a different kind of end-of-year exam—a test of survival. The Coast Guard drops them off on an uninhabited island for two days with just a tarp, a sleeping bag and whatever basics they can fit into a 12-ounce metal coffee can. The youngsters eat what they can forage on the beach. NBA at Disney (1:28:50) Guest: Ben Golliver, NBA Writer for the Washington Post Disney World in Florida will reopen in July to the public, and also, to professional basketball. The NBA has made a deal to have its top teams convene in a “bubble” at Disney World this summer to complete the season and crown a league champion. There will be no audience in the stands. NBA players, coaches and staff will all live on site.