• May 2, 2018 11:00 pm
  • 25:00 mins

Guest: Barbara Lipska, PhD, Director of the Human Brain Collection Core, National Institute of Mental Health and Author of "The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind"   Neuroscientist Barbara Lipska spent her career studying mental illness, and then she lived it. Tumors in her brain brought on all the confusion, irrationality and anger common in people with schizophrenia, which is the exact disease Lipska specializes in studying. Luckily, cutting-edge treatment saved Lipska’s life and restored her mind. She now considers her brain cancer a “priceless gift,” because suffering through mental illness taught her more about how the brain works than dissecting one in a lab ever could.

Other Segments

Bitter Pills

23 MINS

Guest: Muhammad Zaman, PhD, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, author of "Bitter Pills: The Global War on Counterfeit Drugs" If you’re buying cheap Lipitor or Viagra on eBay or a Chinese website, there’s a chance you’re getting a counterfeit. That seems pretty obvious. But the much larger problem for global drug supplies comes down to sloppiness and poor quality. Not that someone is making fake Viagra pills out of chalk, but that lifesaving malaria drugs and antibiotics are tainted with a deadly chemical or don’t have the full amount of active ingredient to make them effective. This problem is terrifyingly common around the world – and even occasionally in the US – according to Boston University biomedical engineering professor Muhammad Zaman's new book, "Bitter Pills."

Guest: Muhammad Zaman, PhD, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, author of "Bitter Pills: The Global War on Counterfeit Drugs" If you’re buying cheap Lipitor or Viagra on eBay or a Chinese website, there’s a chance you’re getting a counterfeit. That seems pretty obvious. But the much larger problem for global drug supplies comes down to sloppiness and poor quality. Not that someone is making fake Viagra pills out of chalk, but that lifesaving malaria drugs and antibiotics are tainted with a deadly chemical or don’t have the full amount of active ingredient to make them effective. This problem is terrifyingly common around the world – and even occasionally in the US – according to Boston University biomedical engineering professor Muhammad Zaman's new book, "Bitter Pills."