• Sep 25, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 27:25 mins

Guest: Aundrea Frahm, Contemporary Artist, “We Revolve Ceaseless” "We Revolve Ceaseless" recently opened at the Museum of Art here at BYU. It is a massive rotating triangular kaleidoscope with large mirrors on the three outer sides that reflect images of the day/night cycle onto the walls of the exhibit room. Viewers can put their heads into the kaleidoscope to see images of the seasons that rotate just like those fractured images in a toy kaleidoscope. We get viewers' reactions to the installation and speak with the artist herself about what it was like engineering art on such a large scale. The mirror dress that Ms. Frahm wore on opening night.

Other Segments

What Ever Happened to Home Ec Class?

13 MINS

Guest: Natalie Hancock, President, Utah Association of Family and Consumer Sciences and Director, Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Brigham Young University Students in middle school and high school today are expected to study reading, writing and arithmetic, just like they always have, but on top of the core basics, they’re also encouraged to study computer coding and foreign language at earlier and earlier ages. Electives like art, music and home economics (now called family sciences) can get squeezed out. And when budgets need to be cut, it’s ironically classes like family sciences  that teach students about personal finance, as well as cooking and sewing, that can be first on the chopping block. There's a lot to lose, though, by cutting family and consumer sciences.

Guest: Natalie Hancock, President, Utah Association of Family and Consumer Sciences and Director, Family and Consumer Sciences Education, Brigham Young University Students in middle school and high school today are expected to study reading, writing and arithmetic, just like they always have, but on top of the core basics, they’re also encouraged to study computer coding and foreign language at earlier and earlier ages. Electives like art, music and home economics (now called family sciences) can get squeezed out. And when budgets need to be cut, it’s ironically classes like family sciences  that teach students about personal finance, as well as cooking and sewing, that can be first on the chopping block. There's a lot to lose, though, by cutting family and consumer sciences.