• May 4, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 28:51 mins

Guest: Nicholas Eberstadt, Political Economist, American Enterprise Institute, author of “Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis” Over the last two generations, there has been a startling rise in the number of men not working, and not looking for work. It’s a problem that has been often overlooked by the government, and its causes are complicated. Some men choose not to work, and that choice is not as socially disparaged as it was in your grandparents’ day. But there are other factors at play, and the economist Nicholas Eberstadt investigates them in his book “Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis.”

Other Segments

Data on Race and Police Shootings

19 MINS

Guest: Ben Montgomery, Reporter, Tampa Bay Times In the past three years, fatal encounters between police and unarmed black men sparked protests across the country. Were these just a handful of tragic but isolated incidents, as law enforcement officials claimed? Or were the shooting deaths of Michael Brown, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and Walter Scott evidence of a larger pattern of racial discrimination by police?  When Tampa Bay Times investigative reporter Ben Montgomery set out to answer that question in Florida, he quickly realized it wouldn’t be easy; no one—not even the FBI—was keeping track of police shootings in the country’s third-largest state. This is also true in most states around the country. So Montgomery and a team at the Tampa Bay Times decided they would. It took more than two years, but now they’re done and he shares his findings with us.

Guest: Ben Montgomery, Reporter, Tampa Bay Times In the past three years, fatal encounters between police and unarmed black men sparked protests across the country. Were these just a handful of tragic but isolated incidents, as law enforcement officials claimed? Or were the shooting deaths of Michael Brown, Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and Walter Scott evidence of a larger pattern of racial discrimination by police?  When Tampa Bay Times investigative reporter Ben Montgomery set out to answer that question in Florida, he quickly realized it wouldn’t be easy; no one—not even the FBI—was keeping track of police shootings in the country’s third-largest state. This is also true in most states around the country. So Montgomery and a team at the Tampa Bay Times decided they would. It took more than two years, but now they’re done and he shares his findings with us.