• Apr 18, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 14:23

g Guest: Rachel Wadham, Host of BYUradio’s “Worlds Awaiting” Rachel Wadham joins us in studio. She’s the education and juvenile collections librarian here at BYU and host of Worlds Awaiting on BYUradio. Today we're discussing the habits of good readers: how you can teach them to your kids and foster them in your own life as well.

The Rise of America's Complacent Class

19:47 MINS

Guest: Tyler Cowen, PhD, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics, Chairman and General Director of the Mercatus Center, George Mason University When Donald Trump campaigned to “Make America Great Again,” he tapped into a feeling among many people that the American Dream is dying – if not already dead. A lot has been made of how disenfranchised white, working-class Americans feel in the current economy, but George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen says there's a wide swath of Americans, from the wealthiest and best-educated among us to those stuck in a cycle of low-wage work and dysfunctional personal lives, who have virtually given up on trying to boost their status. Cowen's new book is called "The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

Guest: Tyler Cowen, PhD, Holbert L. Harris Chair of Economics, Chairman and General Director of the Mercatus Center, George Mason University When Donald Trump campaigned to “Make America Great Again,” he tapped into a feeling among many people that the American Dream is dying – if not already dead. A lot has been made of how disenfranchised white, working-class Americans feel in the current economy, but George Mason University economist Tyler Cowen says there's a wide swath of Americans, from the wealthiest and best-educated among us to those stuck in a cycle of low-wage work and dysfunctional personal lives, who have virtually given up on trying to boost their status. Cowen's new book is called "The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream.”

New Antidote for Snake Venom

14:49 MINS

Guest: Ken Shea, PhD, Chemistry Professor, University of California, Irvine Snake bites are relatively rare in the US, but globally they’re considered a serious threat. More than two-and-a-half million people suffer crippling injuries such as the loss of a limb each year from snake bites. More than 100,000 people die. But effective treatment and antidotes remain elusive – especially in poor, rural areas of Africa and Southeast Asia where the threat is greatest.  So there’s considerable excitement about the work being done by chemist Ken Shea at the University of California at Irvine. He’s developed an anti-venom that’s cheap to make, needs no refrigeration and appears to work on lots of different poisonous snake and insect venoms.

Guest: Ken Shea, PhD, Chemistry Professor, University of California, Irvine Snake bites are relatively rare in the US, but globally they’re considered a serious threat. More than two-and-a-half million people suffer crippling injuries such as the loss of a limb each year from snake bites. More than 100,000 people die. But effective treatment and antidotes remain elusive – especially in poor, rural areas of Africa and Southeast Asia where the threat is greatest.  So there’s considerable excitement about the work being done by chemist Ken Shea at the University of California at Irvine. He’s developed an anti-venom that’s cheap to make, needs no refrigeration and appears to work on lots of different poisonous snake and insect venoms.