• Aug 23, 2018 9:00 pm
  • 11:20 mins

(Originally Aired: 2/27/2018) Guest: Mary Denise Dowd, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Attending Physician, Emergency Department of The Children's Mercy Hospital and Chief, Section of Injury Prevention Last Spring, a viral photo of a Florida four-year-old sparked renewed attention to “dry drowning.” The girl had accidentally inhaled some pool water and vomited, but seemed fine. Days later, though, she was rushed to the emergency room with a fever, accelerated heart rate, and face turning purple. She survived, thankfully, and her mother took to social media to share her story. These dry drowning stories are scary for parents, but many medical experts caution that it’s not a true medical condition. Worse, they worry confusion over “dry drowning” causes parents to panic unnecessarily and distracts from the real risks of drowning.

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A King and an Inventor: The Story of How Hawaii Went Electric Before Most of the World

19 MINS

Guest: Allison Marsh, PhD, Associate Professor of History, University of South Carolina Inventors are always looking for the “next big thing” in technology. These days, that could be artificial intelligence or 3D printing. In the late 1800s, the most exciting technology was electricity itself. Here in America, it didn’t catch on as quickly as you might think, but thanks to a series of events, involving a curious king, a trip to Paris, and a meeting with Thomas Edison—the islands of Hawaii got electricity before most of the world. To put this in perspective, the White House in Washington, DC wasn’t electrified until 1891. By that time, over 800 homes in Honolulu and the King’s palace had electric lights. How did a tiny island Kingdom in the middle of the Pacific get on the cutting edge of this revolution?

Guest: Allison Marsh, PhD, Associate Professor of History, University of South Carolina Inventors are always looking for the “next big thing” in technology. These days, that could be artificial intelligence or 3D printing. In the late 1800s, the most exciting technology was electricity itself. Here in America, it didn’t catch on as quickly as you might think, but thanks to a series of events, involving a curious king, a trip to Paris, and a meeting with Thomas Edison—the islands of Hawaii got electricity before most of the world. To put this in perspective, the White House in Washington, DC wasn’t electrified until 1891. By that time, over 800 homes in Honolulu and the King’s palace had electric lights. How did a tiny island Kingdom in the middle of the Pacific get on the cutting edge of this revolution?