The Baker, The Gay Wedding and the Supreme Court

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Dec 5, 2017
  • 20:20 mins

Guest: Elizabeth Clark, JD, Professor of Law and Associate Director, International Center for Law and Religion Studies, Brigham Young University Tuesday, the high court will hear arguments in the case of Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. Masterpiece Cakeshop is owned by a Christian baker who refused to design a custom wedding cake for a same-sex couple. That couple and the Colorado Civil Rights Commission say the baker can’t discriminate against customers based on sexual orientation because Colorado has a law against that. But the baker says being forced to design a cake for a gay wedding violates his First Amendment right to freedom of speech and religious expression.

Other Segments

Predicting Rainfall During Climate Change

14 MINS

Guest: Michael Bliss Singer, PhD, Researcher, Earth Research Institute, UC Santa Barbara and Lecturer, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University All across the arid West, there are dry streambeds that are pretty much always dry. You’ve probably walked over them without noticing, if you’ve spent much time in Nevada or Arizona. But, if you’ve ever been caught in the desert during a summer thunderstorm, you know how fast that dry streambed can turn into a rush of water. These “runoff events” can cause lots of damage if there are homes nearby, but they’re also a critical part of the desert ecosystem and important for rivers downstream.  Hydrologists at UC Santa Barbara’s Earth Research Institute have been trying to understand how drought and climate change are affecting this thunderstorm-runoff equation in the American West.

Guest: Michael Bliss Singer, PhD, Researcher, Earth Research Institute, UC Santa Barbara and Lecturer, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University All across the arid West, there are dry streambeds that are pretty much always dry. You’ve probably walked over them without noticing, if you’ve spent much time in Nevada or Arizona. But, if you’ve ever been caught in the desert during a summer thunderstorm, you know how fast that dry streambed can turn into a rush of water. These “runoff events” can cause lots of damage if there are homes nearby, but they’re also a critical part of the desert ecosystem and important for rivers downstream.  Hydrologists at UC Santa Barbara’s Earth Research Institute have been trying to understand how drought and climate change are affecting this thunderstorm-runoff equation in the American West.