• May 6, 2017 4:00 pm
  • 31:47 mins

Jonas Kaplan, Ph.D. Assistant Research Professor at the Brian and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California. He is also the Co-Director of the Dornsife Cognitive Neuroimaging Center at USC. He is a cognitive neuroscientist who uses functional brain imaging to study how the brain makes meaning of the world. They say to never to talk about politics and religion in the workplace.  Is this for a good reason?  A study done by the University of Southern California explains why conversations get heated when people talk about politics and when their personal beliefs are challenged.  Jonas Kaplan shares his research.

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Most Strangers Are Safe: Learn to Spot Those Who Are Not

20 MINS

Wendy L. Patrick is a career prosecutor, named the Ronald M. George Public Lawyer of the Year, and recognized by her peers as one of the Top Ten criminal attorneys in San Diego by the San Diego Daily Transcript. She is President of the San Diego Chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals and an ATAP Certified Threat Manager.  Strangers often turn into friends, co-workers, or even life partners. We are motivated to view others positively, because of this potential for building productive relationships. Yet sensing danger should curtail your initial level of courtesy. This risk is enhanced by the reality that in most cases, we are unable to spot dangerous people merely by looking. Actions speak louder than words, and appearances can be deceiving. Wendy Patrick helps us separate the harmful from the harmless.

Wendy L. Patrick is a career prosecutor, named the Ronald M. George Public Lawyer of the Year, and recognized by her peers as one of the Top Ten criminal attorneys in San Diego by the San Diego Daily Transcript. She is President of the San Diego Chapter of the Association of Threat Assessment Professionals and an ATAP Certified Threat Manager.  Strangers often turn into friends, co-workers, or even life partners. We are motivated to view others positively, because of this potential for building productive relationships. Yet sensing danger should curtail your initial level of courtesy. This risk is enhanced by the reality that in most cases, we are unable to spot dangerous people merely by looking. Actions speak louder than words, and appearances can be deceiving. Wendy Patrick helps us separate the harmful from the harmless.