Something Isn't Adding Up: Why Americans are Bad at Math

Top of Mind with Julie Rose - Radio Archive, Episode undefined

  • Nov 19, 2018 10:00 pm
  • 15:27 mins

Guest: James W. Stigler, Professor of Developmental Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles Compared to many other wealthy countries, America’s 15-year-old rank near the bottom on math achievement. And the problem clearly starts earlier: just a third of eighth graders tested proficient at their grade level on math last year, according to US Department of Education.

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The Future is Looking a Bit Hazy and Nuclear

19 MINS

Guest: Allison M. Macfarlane, Professor of Science Policy and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, George Washington University Nuclear power is fading in the US. Most of the nation’s 100 or so nuclear reactors are near the end of their 40-year-life-span initially approved by regulators. More than a dozen have become so expensive to maintain they are slated to be shut down permanently. The nation’s oldest commercial nuclear plant was 49-years-old – and it just closed down for good in Lacey, New Jersey. Meanwhile only one new nuclear power plant is currently under construction in the US.  But America’s nuclear safety rules and regulations were designed for building and maintaining plants, not tearing them down.

Guest: Allison M. Macfarlane, Professor of Science Policy and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, George Washington University Nuclear power is fading in the US. Most of the nation’s 100 or so nuclear reactors are near the end of their 40-year-life-span initially approved by regulators. More than a dozen have become so expensive to maintain they are slated to be shut down permanently. The nation’s oldest commercial nuclear plant was 49-years-old – and it just closed down for good in Lacey, New Jersey. Meanwhile only one new nuclear power plant is currently under construction in the US.  But America’s nuclear safety rules and regulations were designed for building and maintaining plants, not tearing them down.