The Serious Risks of Ignoring Warnings and Leaking Intelligence

The Serious Risks of Ignoring Warnings and Leaking Intelligence

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Security Warnings, Transportation Revolution, Life Beyond Earth

Episode: Security Warnings, Transportation Revolution, Life Beyond Earth

  • May 31, 2017 11:00 pm
  • 21:55 mins

Guest: Richard A. Clarke, leader of counterterrorism efforts for Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Co-author of “Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes” In the aftermath of the Manchester bombing, British intelligence officials briefly stopped sharing information with their American counterparts because a number of details about the investigation were leaked to US media – including the attacker’s name and detailed photos of the bomb scene. President Trump has called for an investigation into leaks from US Intelligence agencies, although in at least one instance, Trump himself was the source of leaked intelligence to Russian officials in the Oval Office. Counterterrorism expert Richard A. Clarke says the US has now developed a reputation as a leaky boat and will not get the level of detail we need from allies who share intelligence with us. Clarke’s new book, “Warnings” explores a variety of disasters – including the rise of ISIS in Syria – which could have been prevented had we heeded the warning of at least one expert who saw the crisis coming.

Other Segments

Can Everyone Eat Local?

May 31, 2017

Guest: Elliott Campbell, PhD, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Merced The “local food” movement has gone beyond a handful of hip, progressive towns to touch nearly every city in America. Farmer’s markets and locally-grown produce are fairly easy to find these days. But even the most devoted locavores have to get some of their diet from beyond the 50-mile radius generally considered the boundary of “local.”  If one day all Americans decided they wanted to eat only local food, would anybody starve? University of California-Merced’s Elliott Campbell analyzed food production and population trends across the country and found that, surprisingly, about 90 percent of the country could be fed by food grown nearby.

Guest: Elliott Campbell, PhD, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering, UC Merced The “local food” movement has gone beyond a handful of hip, progressive towns to touch nearly every city in America. Farmer’s markets and locally-grown produce are fairly easy to find these days. But even the most devoted locavores have to get some of their diet from beyond the 50-mile radius generally considered the boundary of “local.”  If one day all Americans decided they wanted to eat only local food, would anybody starve? University of California-Merced’s Elliott Campbell analyzed food production and population trends across the country and found that, surprisingly, about 90 percent of the country could be fed by food grown nearby.