Mid-East Panel

Mid-East Panel

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Expensive Art, Grit, Mid-East, Red Meat and Cancer

Episode: Expensive Art, Grit, Mid-East, Red Meat and Cancer

  • Nov 12, 2015 10:00 pm
  • 34:15 mins

Guests: John Macfarlane, PhD, Adjunct Political Science at Utah Valley University; Matthew Stathis, PhD, Professor of Political Science at Southern Utah University; Hakan Yavuz, PhD, Professor of Political Science at the University of Utah  Our monthly panel of Middle East experts is back as we consider the growing possibility that terrorists are to blame for the crash of a passenger jet carrying more than 200 Russian tourists. We’ll also be discussing an important recent election in Turkey and the evolving nature of America’s relationship with Iran.

Other Segments

Teacher Quality

20m

Guest: Kate Walsh, President of the National Council on Teacher Quality  A few months into the school year now, and we’re going to address an issue we touched on at the start – the teacher shortage. Hopefully, by now, your child’s class has a teacher and not a perpetual substitute. Back in August we were hearing that a number of large urban districts across the country were struggling to fill all their slots with just days before classes started. But we also learned, in that initial conversation, that talking about a national teacher shortage isn’t very helpful, because the situation varies dramatically from state to state and district to district. A more important conversation centers on how to ensure our children are being taught by the most qualified teachers possible.

Guest: Kate Walsh, President of the National Council on Teacher Quality  A few months into the school year now, and we’re going to address an issue we touched on at the start – the teacher shortage. Hopefully, by now, your child’s class has a teacher and not a perpetual substitute. Back in August we were hearing that a number of large urban districts across the country were struggling to fill all their slots with just days before classes started. But we also learned, in that initial conversation, that talking about a national teacher shortage isn’t very helpful, because the situation varies dramatically from state to state and district to district. A more important conversation centers on how to ensure our children are being taught by the most qualified teachers possible.

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